Israel
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Itinerary
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Links
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Jesus Story
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Food


View Special Travel Map in a larger map (2 pages)
Location
Event/What to See
Map
Flight Nashville to Tel Aviv (Ben Gurion Airport)
Tuesday/Wednesday (Day 1-2)
Hotel: Tel Aviv - Ramada Netanya
Travel 6,434 miles
Nashvile-TelAviv
Thursday (Day 3)
Hotel: Tiberius (Galilee) - Leonardo


Leg 1: Tel Aviv to Caesarea
Leg 2: Caesarea to Muhraka to Druze Village (Isfiya, Mt Carmel)
Leg 3: Druze to Megiddo to Mt Arbel to Tiberias

Travel 57 Km (34 miles)

Caesarea - Herod the Great ruled the Land of Israel from 37 to 4 B.C. During that time he constructed a large port city called Caesarea to honor Roman Caesar Augustus. The project was built on the remains of an earlier Phoenician city called Stratton’s tower. Once it was completed Caesarea took on even more importance than Jerusalem and became the heart of Roman rule in the Land of Israel. Herod built a port in the bay, and erected all the cultural institutions found in every great Greco-Roman city – a theater, a hippodrome, and a luxurious bathhouse. Today the site also includes an exciting audio-vision production on the construction of the port 2,000 years ago, arty shops and restaurants, and hologram figures from the past who speak to you!
St. Peter baptized the Roman Officer Cornelius (the first non-Jew to take Christ as his savior) while lodging in his home in Caesarea. It was also from the Home of Cornelius in Caesarea that St. Peter first brought the message of the Gospel to the Gentiles. Also in Caesarea, Paul was imprisoned by the Romans for two years and once freed, it was from Caesarea that he set sail to his native country of Tarsus . Paul revisited Caesarea several more times during his missionary journeys. Finally, Philip the Apostle resided in Caesarea, and had followed Jesus on his ministries from this city.
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Aqudeduct - The aqueduct, originally built by Herod in the first century BCE, was repaired and expanded by the Romans in the second century CE. It conveyed water to the city from springs at the foot of Mt. Carmel over 10 kms. away.
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Travel 43 Km (26 miles)

B. Muhraka - According to Jewish, Christian, Druze and Muslim belief, it is on this summit that the dramatic battle between Elijah and the prophets of Baal took place. Amid this struggle, the fire that rained down from the sky fell in this exact location.
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C. Druze Village - Lunch. The Druze village of Isfiya is located on the top of the Carmel Mountain commanding a panoramic view of the surrounding green hills. The Druze are well-known for their warm hospitality and receive guests with smiling enthusiasm. The main street of the village has a lively bazaar filled with a variety of colorful shops. Nearby restaurants serve guests spicy ethnic foods.
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Mt Carmel - Mt. Carmel was most significant in ancient times as a barrier to traffic along the coastal plain. The 1500-foot high limestone mountain impeded armies and merchants traveling to the Jezreel Valley.
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Caesarea-Muhraka-DruzeMuhraka - Isfiya

Google Map
Travel 106 Km (63 miles)

B. Megiddo - In Christian apocalyptic literature, Mount Megiddo, the hill overlooking the valley where the current kibbutz is located, is identified as the site of the final battle between the forces of good and evil at the end of time, known as Armageddon.
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C.Mt Arbel - There is no better place to get the “big picture” of Jesus’ public ministry in the Galilee than from the cliffs of Mount Arbel, overlooking the Sea of Galilee from the west.
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D. Tiberias - Herod Antipas named Tiberias for the Roman emperor Tiberius. After the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans CE 70, it became a center of Jewish learning and later the seat of the Sanhedrin and rabbinical schools.
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Druze to Megiddo to Mt Arbel to Tiberias Megiddo
Mt Arbel - Tiberias

Google Map
Tiberias to Ginnosar to Mt Beatitudes to Capernaum to Tabgha to Nazareth
Friday (Day 4)
Hotel: Tiberius (Galilee) - Leonardo
Travel 86 Km (51 miles)

B. Ginnosar - Museum with "Jesus Boat". Roman boat was discovered by accident in the winter of 1986, after a dry season when the lake was very low. It was found on the muddy shores of the sea of Galilee between Ginnosar and Magdala. The boat was dated to the 1st C AD, the times of Jesus and the Jewish Revolt against the Romans.
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C. Mt Beatitudes - Byzantines built a church to commemorate "Sermon on the Mount" at the bottom of the hill.
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D. Capernaum - Home of his first converts, Peter and Andrew; home of Simon and Andrew; Jesus first began to preach after the Temptation in the wilderness; called Levi from his tax-collector's booth; Jesus healed a centurion's servant; healed Peter's mother-in-law; healed the paralytic who was lowered thorugh the roof; and it was Capernaum that Jesus had set out from when he calmed a storm on the Sea of Galilee. It was here that Peter found the coin from the mouth of the fish, upon the command of Jesus, to pay the tax-gatherers (Matt 17:24-27). He resided for a time at Peters house in Capernaum, teaching and healing the sick (Lk 4:31-41). Once He had left, He rebuked the city for their unbelief (Lk 10:15). Today, near the synagogue, there is an octagonal Byzantine church with a mosaic floor built upon the site believed to be the house of Peter. Recent excavations beneath this church has revealed houses dating back to the first century. Some believe that one of these houses could very well be the house of Peter.
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E. Tabgha - Location of the miracle of the loaves and fishes during Jesus' Galilean ministry and a lakeside fish breakfast after Jesus' resurrection.
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G. Nazareth - According to the Gospel of Luke, Nazareth was the home village of Mary and also the site of the Annunciation (when Mary was told by the Angel Gabriel that she would have Jesus as her son). In the Gospel of Matthew, Joseph and Mary resettled in Nazareth after returning from the flight from Bethlehem to Egypt.
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Tiberias to Ginnosar to Mt Beatitudes to Capernaum to Tabgha to Nazareth Ginnosar-Beatitudes-Capernaum-Tabgha Nazareth
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Tiberias to Tell Dan to Banias to Mt Bental to En Gev to Yardenit
Saturday (Day 5)
Hotel: Tiberius (Galilee) - Leonardo
Travel 175 Km (105 miles)

B. Tel Dan - 4 Km from Banias. The Bible tells how 600 families of the Dan tribe looked for a substitute for their location in the center of Israel, by sending 5 spies to the Canaanite city. The Bible refers to the area near Dan as BethRehob (Judges 8 28) "...and it was in the valley that lieth by Bethrehob. And they built a city, and dwelt therein." The city of Dan represented the northern border of the biblical kingdom of Israel. It was here, 2900 years ago, that King Hazael of Damascus punctuated his invasion of Israelite territory with the erection of the famous House of David inscription, the oldest document to mention the historical King David. It is here that visitors can explore King Jeroboam’s temple, which the Hebrew Bible indicates he established to house the golden calf and challenge the temple in Jerusalem for religious supremacy. It was here that Bronze Age inhabitants constructed the world’s oldest known gated archway more than 1500 years before the Romans supposedly invented the arch.
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C. Banias - Banias (Paneas), or Caesarea-Philippi, was an impressive Greco-Roman city located near a flowing spring - one of the sources of the Jordan river, on the foothills of the Hermon mountain. Herod the Great received the whole district from Augustus and dedicated a temple in honor of the emperor. Herod Philip built up the city and called it Caesarea Philippi to distinguish it from his father's Caesarea on the seacoast.
Mark 8:27-30 "Now Jesus and His disciples went out to the towns of Caesarea Philippi; and on the road He asked His disciples, saying to them, "Who do men say that I am?" So they answered, "John the Baptist; but some say, Elijah; and others, one of the prophets." He said to them, "But who do you say that I am?" Peter answered and said to Him, "You are the Christ." Then He charged them that they should tell no one about Him."
A woman from Paneas, who had been bleeding for 12 years, is said to have been miraculously cured by Jesus. According to tradition, after she had been cured, she had a statue of Christ erected.
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D. Mt Bental - The Mount Bental overlook is beautiful and provides stunning views of Mount Hermon and the Golan. Located in the Golan Heights. Just to the east of Mount Bental is Syria, with Damascus lying just 60km away. In the Yom Kippur War of 1973, Mount Bental was the site of one of the largest tank battles in history. The Syrians attacked the Golan with 1,500 tanks and 1,000 artillery pieces. Israel countered with only 160 tanks and 60 artillery pieces. The long stretch of valley in between Mount Bental and Mount Hermon became known as the Valley of Tears.
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E. Ein Gev - Lunch. Situated along a border initially shared with Syria, Ein Gev was shelled during the Battles of the Kinarot Valley and in other engagements during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War. These dangers were only eliminated when Israel succeeded in permanently displacing Syrian military forces from the neighboring Golan Heights in the 1967 Six-Day War.
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F. Yardenit - Yardenit, the celebrated baptismal site on the sacred Jordan River in Israel, embrace Pilgrims from the four corners of the earth who come to the Holy Land for a specific purpose: to walk in the footsteps of Jesus and to be part of the baptismal ritual of following their Savior through the waters of baptism.
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Tel Dan-Banias-Bental-EnGev-Yardenit Tel Dan- Banias - Bental Ein Gev - Yardenit
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Tiberias to Beit She'an to Qumran, Mas'ada to Ein Bokek
Sunday (Day 6)
Hotel: Ein Bokek - LeMeridien
Travel 215 Km (129 miles)

B. Beit She'an - Conquered by Egypt in the 15th century B.C.E. Beit She’an became a Canaanite city several centuries later and eventually was taken over by the Philistines. It was on the walls of this Philistine city, located on a tel above the main excavations, that the bodies of King Saul and his son Jonathan were hung. (In the 11th C BC, King Saul's body was displayed on its walls after his defeat by the Philistines (1 Samuel 31 10: "...and they fastened his body to the wall of Bethshan"). The Canaanite/Philistine city was burnt in the 10th C by King David. His son, King Solomon, rebuilt it and made it an important administration city (1 Kings 4 7-12: "And Solomon had twelve officers over all Israel... Baana the son of Ahilud; to him pertained Taanach and Megiddo, and all Bethshean, which is by Zartanah beneath Jezreel".
Although there are interesting finds in the ancient tel, the most fascinating are from the Roman-era pagan city of Scythopolis located at its foot. This city was magnificent, combining Roman glory and Greek culture. A typical commercial byway, called a cardo, can still be seen today, along with the forum, marketplace, Roman bathhouse, and theater. Still in use, the Roman theater and its adjacent amphitheater are among the most impressive so far discovered in Israel.
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C. Qumran - Lunch. Qumran is best known as the settlement nearest to the caves in which the Dead Sea Scrolls were hidden, caves in the sheer desert cliffs and beneath, in the marl terrace
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D. Mas'ada - Masada is a rugged natural fortress, of majestic beauty, in the Judaean Desert overlooking the Dead Sea. It is a symbol of the ancient kingdom of Israel, its violent destruction and the last stand of Jewish patriots in the face of the Roman army, in 73 A.D. It was built as a palace complex, in the classic style of the early Roman Empire, by Herod the Great, King of Judaea, (reigned 37 – 4 B.C.). The camps, fortifications and attack ramp that encircle the monument constitute the most complete Roman siege works surviving to the present day.
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E. Ein Bokek - Hotel and resort district on the Israeli shore of the Dead Sea.
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Travel to Jerusalem
Monday (Day 7)
Hotel: Jerusalem - Leonardo Plaza

Leg 1: Ein Bokek to En Gedi overlook to St George monastery (near Mitspe Yeriho?) to Jerusalem
Leg 2: Arrive Jerusalem

Travel 113 Km (68 miles)

B. Ein Gedi - Ein Gedi is an oasis in the desert and a green Garden of Eden in the wilderness. It is situated on the shore of the Dead Sea – the lowest place on Earth - at the feet of majestic mountains and cliffs. David took refuge in Ein Gedi when he was pursued by King Saul, and rebels fled there from Jerusalem. Valuable persimmon oil and rare perfumes were produced there, and temples and synagogues were established here to strengthen the Jewish stronghold in the area.
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C. St George monastery - Just a few minutes from the Jerusalem-Dead Sea highway, St. George’s Monastery awaits amid a spectacular biblical desert where Christian monks maintain their ancient way of life. St. George’s Monastery began in the fourth century with a few monks who sought the desert experiences of the prophets, John the Baptist and Jesus, and settled around a cave where they believed Elijah was fed by ravens (1 Kings 17:5-6).
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Travel Jerusalem

Palm Sunday Path - Starting at the top of the Mount of Olives, walking down Palm Sunday Road, and ending at the Eastern Gate, the path that Jesus took his last days in Israel is a spiritual journey for many tourists. It was on this road that Jesus road a donkey to the Temple Mount, and was later to be sacrificed on the Mount of Olives four days later. The sheer majesty and beauty of the Dome of the Rock and the Old City before you as you walk is breath taking.
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Dominus Flevit - A Roman Catholic church located on the Mount of Olives immediately facing the Old City of Jerusalem. Dominus Flevit, which translates from Latin as "The Lord Wept", was fashioned in the shape of a teardrop to symbolize the tears of Christ. Here, according to the 19th chapter of the Gospel of Luke, Jesus, while walking toward the city of Jerusalem, becomes overwhelmed by the beauty of the Second Temple and predicting its future destruction, and the diaspora of the Jewish people, weeps openly. (Luke 19:37-42).
One of the newest churches in Jerusalem, Dominus Flevit sits atop an ancient site. During construction of the sanctuary archaeologists uncovered artifacts dating back to the Canaanite period, as well as tombs from both the Second Temple and Byzantine eras.
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Church of all Nations - The Church was also known as the Church or Basilica of the Agony, is a Roman Catholic church located on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem, next to the Garden of Gethsemane. It enshrines a section of bedrock where Jesus is said to have prayed before his arrest. (Mark 14:32-42).
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Garden of Gethsemane - Garden at the foot of the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem most famous as the place where, according to the gospels, Jesus and his disciples are said to have prayed the night before he was arrested, the day before his death. According to the New Testament it was a place that Jesus and his disciples customarily visited, which allowed Judas to find him on the night of his arrest.
There are four locations claimed to be the place where Jesus prayed on the night he was betrayed.

  1. The Church of All Nations overlooking a garden with a so-called "Rock of the Agony."
  2. The location near the Tomb of the Virgin to the north.
  3. The Greek Orthodox location to the east.
  4. The Russian Orthodox orchard, next to the Church of Mary Magdalene by an orchard.
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Jerusalem
Tuesday (Day 8)
Hotel: Jerusalem - Leonardo Plaza
Jerusalem

Temple Mount - Jewish tradition holds that it is the site where God gathered the dust to create Adam and where Abraham nearly sacrificed his son Isaac to prove his faith. King Solomon, according to the Bible, built the First Temple of the Jews on this mountaintop circa 1000 B.C., only to have it torn down 400 years later by troops commanded by the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar, who sent many Jews into exile. In the first century B.C., Herod expanded and refurbished a Second Temple built by Jews who had returned after their banishment. It is here that, according to the Gospel of John, Jesus Christ lashed out against the money changers (and was later crucified a few hundred yards away). The Roman general Titus exacted revenge against Jewish rebels, sacking and burning the Temple in A.D. 70.
Among Muslims, the Temple Mount is called Haram al-Sharif (the Noble Sanctuary). They believe it was here that the Prophet Muhammad ascended to the “Divine Presence” on the back of a winged horse—the Miraculous Night Journey, commemorated by one of Islam’s architectural triumphs, the Dome of the Rock shrine. A territorial prize occupied or conquered by a long succession of peoples—including Jebusites, Israelites, Babylonians, Greeks, Persians, Romans, Byzantines, early Muslims, Crusaders, Mamluks, Ottomans and the British—the Temple Mount has seen more momentous historical events than perhaps any other 35 acres in the world.
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Church of St Anne's - The Church of St Anne is the best-preserved Crusader church in Jerusalem. It marks the traditional site of the home of Jesus’ maternal grandparents, Anne and Joachim, and the birthplace of the Virgin Mary. Located just north of the Temple Mount, about 50 metres inside St Stephen’s or Lions’ Gate, the church stands in a courtyard with trees, shrubs and flowers. Its tranquility contrasts with the bustling streets and alleys of the Muslim Quarter. See the video Next to the church is the large excavation area of the Pools of Bethesda, where Christ healed a sick man (John 5:2-9).
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Via Dolorosa - Via Dolorosa ("Way of Grief" in Latin) is a road in the old city of Jerusalem, a path where Jesus was lead in agony, carrying the crucifixion cross. There are a total of 14 stations along this path, based on events that occurred on the way to the Golgotha hill, the site of crucifixion, which is located at the Church of the Holy Sepulcher. Eight stations are marked along the old city road, while 6 additional stations are places in the compound of the church. Via Dolorosa is located within the old city of Jerusalem. It starts from the place where he was tried and convicted - near the Lions' gate on the eastern side (Muslim quarter). It ends in the crucifixion place, Golgotha, where the Church of the Holy Sepulcher is located in the west side of the old city (Christian quarter).
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Holy Sepulchre - The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, known as the Church of the Resurrection (Anastasis) to Eastern Orthodox Christians, is a church in the Old City of Jerusalem that is the holiest Christian site in the world. It stands on a site that is believed to encompass both Golgotha, or Calvary, where Jesus was crucified, and the tomb (sepulchre) where he was buried. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre has been an important pilgrimage destination since the 4th century.
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Christian Quarter (lunch) - The Christian Quarter is one of the four quarters of the ancient, walled Old City of Jerusalem, the other three being the Jewish Quarter, the Muslim Quarter and the Armenian Quarter. The Christian Quarter is situated in the northwestern corner of the Old City, extending from the New Gate in the north, along the western wall of the Old City as far as the Jaffa Gate, along the Jaffa Gate - Western Wall route in the south, bordering on the Jewish and Armenian Quarters, as far as the Damascus Gate in the east, where it borders on the Muslim Quarter. The Christian quarter contains about 40 Christian holy places. Among them is the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, one of Christianity's holiest places.
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Yad Vashem - Israel's official memorial to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust, established in 1953 through the Yad Vashem Law passed by the Knesset, Israel's parliament.
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Jerusalem
Wednesday (Day 9)
Hotel: Jerusalem - Leonardo Plaza
Jerusalem

Southern Steps - The northernmost extension of the Jerusalem pilgrim road leading from the Pool of Siloam to the Temple Mount via the Double Gate and the Triple Gate, collectively called the Huldah Gates. These are the steps that Jesus of Nazareth[1][2] and other Jews of his era walked up to approach the Temple, especially on the great pilgrimage festivals of Passover, Shavuot and Sukkot
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Jewish Quarter - The most famous site of the Jewish Quarter is The Western Wall, a portion of the massive retaining wall built by King Herod in the 1st century BCE, expanding the Temple Mount that once contained the Temple of Jerusalem and today is home to the Dome of the Rock and Al-Aqsa Mosque. It consists of huge ashlar blocks that have been in place for two millennia. It is a major site for pilgrimage for Jewish people from all over the world, and is also a major tourist attraction for people of all faiths. Visitors insert handwritten prayers into the interstices between the stones. Numerous worshipers read Psalms in front of the wall and bar Mitzvahs are celebrated there.
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Upper Room - Also known as "The Room of the Last Supper" is a space adjacent to the Old City walls and near David’s Tomb on Mount Zion. It is in this space that many believe Jesus ate the infamous last supper with his twelve disciples. The site of the Last Supper is not known and the Gospel accounts provide few clues. It cannot be the present room, which was built in the 12th century. However, it is possible it stands over or near the original site of the Last Supper and/or Pentecost.
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Garden Tomb - The Garden Tomb (also known as Gordon's Calvary),[1] located in Jerusalem, outside the city walls and close to the Damascus Gate, is a rock-cut tomb considered by some to be the site of the burial and resurrection of Jesus, and to be adjacent to Golgotha,[2] in contradistinction to the traditional site for these—the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.
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Israel Museum - The Israel Museum is the largest cultural institution in the State of Israel and is ranked among the world’s leading art and archaeology museums. Founded in 1965, the Museum houses encyclopedic collections, including works dating from prehistory to the present day, in its Archaeology, Fine Arts, and Jewish Art and Life Wings, and features the most extensive holdings of biblical and Holy Land archaeology in the world.
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Jerusalem
Thursday (Day 10)
Hotel: Jerusalem - Leonardo Plaza
Jerusalem
Day of Leisure and late flight home -